But the reality is (as is often the case) different.

Seems a school cop in Florida set up a MySpace page in order to “connect” more with the kids within the school where he worked. As is the norm for social networking sites, he friended a number of people from his school. One of those “friends” had a link on his profile to, you guessed it, a porn site.

The St. Peterburg Times puts it in suitably emotive terms saying that “kids could navigate from Officer John’s page on the social networking site to ‘Amateur Match Free Sex’ in just three clicks.” So big deal says I. Officer John wasn’t posting porn, links to porn or any references to pornographic material.

There is about as much guilt attributable to this poor guy as there is to me when someone Googles “diversity” and comes across sites detailing bestiality and necrophilia. I mean come on here, the internet is made up of three syllables. One of those syllables is “net” short for “network” – in the case of the web we’re all only a few degrees removed from terrorists, murderers or worse. What legitimacy is there for attributing guilt to those whose social graph includes undesirable people or behaviours.

Some people need to get a sense of perspective. Methinks the ones complaining about these sorts of event are those that are scared of the empowering attributes of the web.

Thoughts anyone else?

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Ben Kepes

Ben Kepes is a technology evangelist, an investor, a commentator and a business adviser. Ben covers the convergence of technology, mobile, ubiquity and agility, all enabled by the Cloud. His areas of interest extend to enterprise software, software integration, financial/accounting software, platforms and infrastructure as well as articulating technology simply for everyday users.

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